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Change and Progress in Roundnet: Players Have a CHOICE


Change and Progress in Roundnet: Players Have a CHOICE

Part 1

Choices in Roundnet Spikeball Blog post Roundnet World

Revised 5/10/2020 - By: Tom Witt - ‘Witt Roundnet Round-Up

 

*VOTE ON POLL QUESTION IN ARTICLE!*

 

Change - It Is Up to US

Roundnet has gone through much change since it’s early start as a backyard game. 

The rules, equipment, attitudes, strategies, and much more have been altered over the years. 

Those changes have not always been influenced by ‘the powers that be’ but by mainly the PLAYERS. 

It is up to US as roundnet participants and enthusiasts to be the leaders in that purposeful change in our sport. 

With this power in our hands, we literally have the opportunity to mold the trajectory of the sport of roundnet, and how future generations play the game. 

That is an opportunity that most sport participants do not ever have! 

WE must take advantage of this once in a lifetime opportunity!

 

Roundnet, Rallies and Progress

One topic that has been on the forefront of the roundnet nation over the last few years has been how can we increase rallies? 

The term ‘serveball’ has been thrown around and has caught on in the community when describing what some think the sport has turned into. 

To increase rallies some people suggest rules need to change, some suggest equipment modifications need to be made, some have other opinions. 

 

Players Have a Choice

Personally, I think those are all solid options that should, and have been explored. 

Though, in the end I think that it comes down to us, the players, making choices to shape the future of the sport.

 

A Meeting in the Middle

To clarify, I do not think aces are bad for the game.

I think aces make things exciting for spectators and give the lower level players an aspect of the sport they can practice on their own, with no one else, to improve and get to the top level.

I think one of the problems with the emphasis on serving aces is multifaceted; the slow down of pace of play for second serves slows down the game and makes it less interesting to watch at times, which is a minor problem that some in the community have voiced in the past when the two serve rule was first put into effect.

Though, to me the main problem is when players think that getting an ace is the only way to win, and move up in the rankings, so they hit lots of double faults

Instead, they should be taking some off their second serve, getting the ball on the net and playing defense to try and extend the point. While practicing that ace serve, and more serves, and getting better with practice and time.

Aces = excitement, double faults = boring. And in my opinion, this change will be a CHOICE made by us as roundnet players. 

 

Roundnet - A History of Change

Change has been the only constant in the history of roundnet.

After doing some digging on the Spikeball Roundnet Association Facebook page, I found this excerpt from 2012 by SRA board member and 2 time national champion, Skyler Boles interesting.

Boles stated, “When we have easy gentlemen's serves the points are over in 5 seconds. there is no flow to the game because it is always start and stop. I find myself purposefully not ending points when I return the easy serve because it is boring and the point never starts. This happens even in tournament situations. I do not want to win like that if that is how I have to win. This is also not a fun way to watch Spikeball. We must think of our fans.”  

Boles went on to say, 

“I am baffled by how hard it has been to try and change how people serve in competitive tournaments. Hopefully we can keep trying to change people's minds little by little. Just take a few steps back. it is OK if it goes over your head. (i think it is easier to pass or set from this position personally) and if it is too hard, still try to get it but if you can't you just re-do it. SIMPLE, FUN, COMPETITIVE, ENTERTAINING, SEXY!”

Change has been a constant part of the roundnet scene since the early days.

In the early days of roundnet, players would play different rules across the country; two returners on the serve, the ability to set picks, playing off the rim if your team still has a touch left, gentlemans serves, etc. 

Now, I am not advocating for the game to go back to gentleman serves but some changes need to be made and they aren’t going to be the ones written in the rule book, they will be made by the players on the field making decisions of how this sport should be played. 

Conversation and Roundnet: Crucial to Growth

I was watching former national champion Preston Bies live streaming on his YouTube page, How To Roundnet, and he was asked who he thinks has the hardest serve in the world. 

Preston stated that he thinks him or Simon Briebois of Canada have the hardest serve in the world, but that he (Preston) rarely hits that serve in a game because it hurts his elbow and shoulder and isn’t high enough of a percentage to add into his tournament serve repertoire to help him be successful and win. 

Again, it comes down to choice. 

I am not saying that aces are bad for the sport. I think that double faults and the notion that you can only get to the top level if you have a cut serve, are not true

 

Change… On Purpose!

Change will happen at all levels of roundnet play if top players continue to emphasize via social media things such as: game play videos, conversation, etc. that they are choosing to hit a higher percentage serve, instead of the one that may be a sick ace, but most likely end up in a fault, for success.

Influence from top players can go a long way to change our sport. 

 

Veteran Ballers

Another great example is Hornaboles, a 2019 pro level team made up of veterans Skyler Boles and Chris Hornacek. Although Chris is known for a hard serve, he also diligently practices other aspects, especially weaker aspects, of his game to improve!

Skyler has been a top player since the inception of the sport, when many have dropped off, and he has done this with a less than powerful serve and rarely relying on aces, or big hits, to be successful. 

NATIONAL CHAMPIONS MAKING CHOICES

An example of top players in the world making choices happened at 2019 SRA Nationals in the championship final. 

3 time national champion PJ Showalter was hitting a few NASTY fwango style serves that would usually either be an insane ace, or a fault. 

Though, he didn’t over-use that serve to his disadvantage. 

There was a fine line, and though PJ was able to get some aces with that fwango, he also had some pockets and faults.

PJ didn’t go for his crazy fwango every time, for strategic reasons, it usually ended in either an ace or a fault. 

Strategy decided- Hey, I’m not going to hit my crazy ace serve every time because it also pockets or rims a lot and instead I’ll hit my next best serve and let our defense and a bad first touch help my team win points.

PJ’s fingerprints are on many SRA tournament victory pitchers and national championship trophies for a reason. 

He has a choice, so do you. 

 

Change in Sport is Inevitable... and Necessary. 

Change happens in all sports, but isn’t always at the forefront of the conversation.

An excerpt from “History of NCAA Basketball Rule Changes” stated that up until the mid 1920’s the game of basketball had a rule that after every basket there was a tip off, games regularly ended in scores of 15-13. There was no 3 point shot until 1986-87, and up until 1976-77 the slam dunk was ILLEGAL, and if attempted would probably end up in a good walloping from an opponent or opponents who deemed the slam dunk as disrespectful. 

Something that stuck out to me was a rule change made to basketball in 1920-21 which was, “The basket is moved to two feet from the baseline. Previously the players could climb the padded wall to get closer to the basket (with the new rule the wall is out of bounds).” That’s quite a change from 2020 NBA basketball.

The rules, as well as attitudes changed over time have made the sport of basketball more fun to play and to watch for spectators. 

The NBA embraces change and seems to have the fan in mind in all of their decisions, which has led to success and continued growth in players and spectators over the years. 

I am not trying to state that the Spikeball Roundnet Association does not try to improve the sport, they do! But they can only do so much in terms of rule changes, equipment modifications, etc. so it is up to us as players to make a choice to make a change.

 

Other Athletes Using Their ‘Choice’ to Impact Sport

I’ll make another NBA reference: Just like NBA star Steph Curry can hit open half court shots at a higher percentage than most people who have walked this earth, and in the NBA, he still chooses to not shoot that shot even when he is open, he has a choice! 

He knows he has the capability of hitting those half court shots, or even very long 3’s, and he is open most of the time for it, but he makes the decision to not do that.

That decision is being influenced by coaches, pressure from fans who would voice their opinion after too many missed half court heaves, media who would blast him for the terrible decisions, the list goes on.

We as roundnet players determine the future of this sport, we have no coaches, general managers, talking heads shaping the game and how it is played.

Stop CHOOSING to hit an insane serve and instead choose to change the game for the better and be an example that people can look at, practice and try to emulate. 

 

Different Rules, Same Sport - Different Outcomes!

Another example is how different rules, in the same sport, but different organizations, can change how the sport is played. 

There are a few rule differences between the NBA and the American Basketball Association (ABA), the league that Julius Erving better known as Dr.J, played in with the red, white and blue basketball. 

The NBA rules require the offense to get the ball past the half court line within 8 seconds of getting possession, for years it was 10 seconds, or else a violation is enforced and the other team receives the ball. The ABA has a 7 second version of that rule, and that 1 second makes it so the offense literally cannot walk the ball up the court or else they will get a turnover. 

Coaches coach differently, players play differently, the game is different because of one slight rule change.

Another Example

Another rule the ABA uses to speed up the game, and create different opportunities, is if the defense gets a steal in the backcourt and then they go down and score a 2 point basket off of that turnover, the offense receives 3 points. 

These two rules are intended to speed up the game. These simple rule changes change how the same game of basketball is played between two different leagues. 

 

The Power of Change is in OUR Hands

Change can happen in roundnet, and it does not always need to be mandated in the rules, but sometimes in how we as the players decide to progress and represent the sport. 

The increased emphasis on having a serve that can ace people or create an unfavorable first touch has been a MAJOR strategy change in the sport over the years. 

In the early years of competitive roundnet aces were rarely a thing. 

Other new rules such as the addition of the two serve rule in the recent seasons, which has also been a catalyst for conversation.

I think that community members throwing out ideas is helpful, and it doesn’t mean we are going to implement them all. 

But talking about it more progresses the sport, and that is awesome!

If we bring up ideas/test something out and it doesn’t make things better, then we have just validated what we currently do as best practice, and if we find something better, well then we improve an already awesome sport! A ‘Win-Win’!

Change will continue to happen, how will we as players help shape that change?

 

Check back in for part 2 of “Change and Progress in Roundnet: Players Have a CHOICE” on RoundnetWorld.com, and ‘Witt Roundnet Round-Up’

Written by Tom Witt - 5/9/20

Link to Tom’s blog with other roundnet articles: 

Witt Roundnet Round-Up

 

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5 comments

  • Eamon

    What Dave said about the 7 foot serve is a no go and here’s why.

    At 5 foot 4 I cannot serve a legit serve from that far away, and I’m sure that a lot of short guys and girls agree with me there. I have enough trouble getting serves on from 6 feet away cuz my angle sucks. Also the real weakness in the game is defence, the offensive team has way more power than the defence, that’s why serving aces are so sought after because people are so good at hitting that if they get a decent up off serve they are most likely putting it away on their first hit. At my level (probably low to mid advanced) I think me and my team mate need to get better at defence, but at premier there might need to be some sort of handicap such as raised rim or bigger ball. Maybe defence just needs to catch up and I honestly hope that that’s the case cuz equipment change would blow. Plz give any feedback you have on what I’ve said. Peace 🇨🇦

  • Tom Witt

    Thank you both for your comments, Caleb and Dave!
    I agree with what both of you are suggesting!
    Caleb: I thought the 2019 Nationals Finals was a GREAT example of what roundnet should be. Like I mentioned in the article, PJ and Preston can both choose to hit an insane serve that MIGHT get on the net, but instead they hit their like 94% insane serve instead of their 100% insane serve, it’s still nasty AND it still gets on the net. There is a balance between too easy, and just ripping your shoulder off trying to serve as absolute hard as you can.

    Cheers!

  • Caleb Schmidt

    I don’t think there needs to be change at all. It may seem like our sport is dictated by serving and aces but that’s because serving naturally progresses before serve receive does. Just like hitting improves before defence does. The Nationals finals was not a game determined by aces anymore than it was determined by defence and rallies. That’s because the pros defence has caught up to the offense. Yes they got aces but only when they had an amazing serve, which was not every time by any stretch. At the end of the day the people who do good are the people putting in the work to get that crazy good serve and that crazy good defence. It’s so much easier to practice serving than serve receive so right now serving is somewhat more dominant but I believe in time it will even out. It just takes time to catch up.

  • Caleb Schmidt

    I don’t think there needs to be change at all. It may seem like our sport is dictated by serving and aces but that’s because serving naturally progresses before serve receive does. Just like hitting improves before defence does. The Nationals finals was not a game determined by aces anymore than it was determined by defence and rallies. That’s because the pros defence has caught up to the offense. Yes they got aces but only when they had an amazing serve, which was not every time by any stretch. At the end of the day the people who do good are the people putting in the work to get that crazy good serve and that crazy good defence. It’s so much easier to practice serving than serve receive so right now serving is somewhat more dominant but I believe in time it will even out. It just takes time to catch up.

  • Dave

    Good points. But I think that if the SRA wants longer rallies.
    1. new equipment has to be released
    2. Less complicated rules on the serves. In my opinion serves should be a 7 ft. Line with a designated area behind the line. One foot has to stay in that area but player can move freely. Making serves easy to understand will speed up the game

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